Janusz Trempała The need to believe in the power of reason and in a rational order [Potrzeba wiary w siłę rozumu oraz w racjonalny porządek]

PDF Abstrakt

Rocznik: 2023

Tom: XXVIII

Numer: 3

Tytuł: The need to believe in the power of reason and in a rational order [Potrzeba wiary w siłę rozumu oraz w racjonalny porządek]

Autorzy: Janusz Trempała

PFP: PL 245–258 / EN 259-272

DOI: https://doi.org/10.34767/PFP.2023.03.01

The article is available under the terms international 4.0 license (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0).

Introduction

The title of the lecture may intrigue and even arouse resistance. It covers the relationship of contradiction between belief and the scientific image of the world, established in popular thinking.

In the lecture, I refer to the criticism of empiricism presented by Adam Niemczyński, initiating a panel discussion on the theory of human development at the 24th National Conference of Developmental Psychologists (UKSW, Warsaw, 2015). In the first panel organized by Adam Niemczyński, I strongly supported empiricism in psychology (see Trempała, 2017). Please treat the title of this lecture as an intellectual provocation. I have not changed my views on the importance of empirical facts in scientific knowledge. However, I wonder about the limitations of scientific knowledge and their consequences.

Psychology used to be concerned about the lack of a single, general and comprehensive theory of human behavior and development. Today something else is starting to worry me. While modern science is based on the belief in the “power of reason” and the universal perfection of the principles of formal logic in describing and explaining reality, there are many indications that nowadays, despite increasingly better education and wider access to information, or perhaps because of this reason, public trust in evidence-based science is declining.

Generally speaking, we see increasing signs of loss of Enlightenment respect for scientific knowledge in social life. Resistance to the Enlightenment is not new. It has its own history. Its manifestations are changing (Phillips, 2020). Nowadays, this phenomenon is expressed, among others, in:

  • the increasing popularity of conspiracy theories related to the intellectual laziness of Internet users, wallowing in nonsense and half-truths (which strengthens deviations from rationality),
  • increasingly brazen and unpunished lies, intellectual frauds and manipulations of social awareness to achieve the goals of current policy and marketing needs (which strengthens resistance to facts, expressed in the tendency to reject knowledge based on facts),
  • in the decline of the authority of scientists, who sometimes engage in mind-less media debates in which scientists are unable to cope with the unjustified, accidental associations of their participants (which reveals the gap between scientific and common knowledge).

We say we live in the post-truth era. This term was announced by the Oxford Dictionaries as the word of the year 2016, and the phenomenon itself has recently become the subject of empirical research and quite serious analysis in the social sciences (see, e.g., Marmion, 2019; Phillips, 2020). Two questions arise in this context:

(1) Where does people’s resistance to facts come from, expressed in the tendency to reject knowledge based on facts, deviations from rationality and the observed distrust and even ignorance of scientific knowledge?

(2) No less important is the question of what this means for the scientific disciplines in which scientists work they collect facts and use them to describe the image of the world and look for applications of scientific knowledge in social practice.

Finding answers to these questions is not easy. It exceeds the boundaries of one discipline. However, it seems that the belief in the “power of human reason” and the rational order of the world is not enough to find comprehensive answers.

Nevertheless, I put these questions at the center of the presented lecture. Out of necessity, I will limit myself to issues that are close to me as a development al psychologist. I will look for the sources of the decline in social trust in theories based on facts and scientific knowledge in two areas: (a) the formation of post-formal ways of thinking in the cognitive development of an individual (at the ontogenetic level), and (b) the lack of a “good” theory of behavior and human development in psychology (at the epistemological level).

Development of logical thinking

I will start with the problem of cognitive development in ontogeny. I will briefly address the thesis that: The individual’s cognitive development does not proceed solely towards increasingly more perfect forms of logical thinking and does not end in adolescence when the ability to use formal logical operations is achieved.

Jean Piaget established in psychology the belief that the cognitive development of children and adolescents proceeds in a universal, necessary and unchanging sequence from sensorimotor intelligence (0), through preoperational ideas (I) and concrete operations (II) to formal logical operations (III), which undergo consolidation in adolescence (IIIB). Piaget identified the stage with maturity and the end of people’s cognitive development, and in fact with the genesis of scientific cognition, which was the basic goal of his great research project.

I will ask perversely: what does it matter if an individual achieves the ability to use consolidated methods of formal and logical reasoning if they often turn out to be useless in solving problems encountered in everyday life?

It should be emphasized that to this day no one has questioned the sequence of changes in the development of logical reasoning in children and adolescents described by Piaget. Doubts only apply to:

(a) age limits, and
(b) what happens in the cognitive development of an individual after adolescence, after achieving the ability to reason formally and logically.

At the end of the 20th century, the number of empirical reports began to grow exponentially, the authors of which proved that non-operative or post-formal ways of cognition develop after adolescence.

An extremely interesting dispute has arisen as to whether the ways of thinking identified in adulthood are, for example, relativistic (Perry, 1970; Sinnot, 1984; 1998), dialectical (Riegel, 1975; Basseches, 1980), or intersystemic (Labouvie-Vief, 1980; 2003) or mata systemic (Commons, Richards, Kuhn, 1982), is an expression of: (a) a revisionist position: qualitatively new forms of cognition compared to Piaget’s, emerging in human development after adolescence (e.g. relativistic or dialectical thinking), or (b) conservative position: further development of formal operations described by Piaget, their further consolidation (e.g. metasystemic – logic of a higher order than described by Piaget).

In my research in this area, I initially opted for a revisionist position, in the belief that cognitive development is not one-dimensional, in line with the direction of logical reasoning described by Piaget, and does not end in adolescence (Trempała, 1986; 1989). At the same time, my belief in the power of reason and the usefulness of logical reasoning in solving real problems began to weaken as a result of research on children and adolescents’ resistance to the temptation to cheat (Trempała, 1993). In a natural experiment, I proved that resistance to fraud increases not only with the level of development of logical and moral reasoning of the subjects but also depends on the situation of temptation: There are no honest people in general, they are honest depending on the situation.

My doubts were deepened by the suggestions of many researchers that educational and technological progress has expanded people’s access to information, but its surplus exceeds the cognitive capabilities of an individual in a coherent approach: (a) it increases the impression of chaos (Obuchowski, 1997) and information stress (Ledzińska, 2002); (b) generates cognitive uncertainty and departures from rationality, expressed in cognitive biases and errors described, for example, in social psychology (see Kruglanski, Ajzen, 1983; Kahneman, 2012; and in Polish literature: Mądrzycki, 1986; Lewicka, 1993 et al.).

Today I am not sure that rejecting the conservative position is a mistake. I lean towards an integrative position. I see Piaget’s reasons, but also his critics at that time, pointing to alternative paths of cognitive development (see, e.g., Siegel, Brainerd, 1978, and Labouvie-Vief, 1980; 2003).

When thinking about the sources of people’s trouble dealing with facts, I focused my attention on two issues:

  • The contextual nature of human cognition. Cognition is only possible in the context of a specific cognitive system (e.g. point of view, cognitive perspective or assumptions underlying the expressed judgments and their justification);
  • Limitations of logical systems in removing cognitive uncertainty related to the multitude of possible judgments/solutions depending on the adopted cognitive context.

Development of contextual thinking

In my research on the development of contextual reasoning in early adulthood (Trempała, 1989), I used Gilligan and Marphy’s (1979) 9-point scale operationalizing Perry’s concept of epistemic commitment (1970).

Because I had trouble clearly identifying specific stages/phases, I distinguished three stages of contextual reasoning according to Perry’s (1970) three categories of nine levels of growth in epistemic commitment: (a) modified judgment dualism; (b) discovered relativism; (c) a developed commitment to relativism (see the discussion: Schommer, 1990).


Stages of development of contextual reasoning

(Trempała, 2021, pp. 96–99)

Stage 1. FORMISM1: absolutism and certainty of judgment. Absolute judgments and unambiguous solutions concerning authorities or standards set by authorities. Statements often contain contradictory judgments and/or their justifications. The individual is not aware of their contradictions and avoids discussing alternative judgments/solutions to the problem.

Stage 2. UNCERTAINTY: awareness of contradictory judgments and confusion. Typical statements for this stage often begin with the statement: “and yes…, and… no.” The individual formulates contradictory judgments, and is aware of their contradiction, but does not understand it and cannot resolve it. Even if they can justify separately each of the contradictory directions of judgments, they are not able to choose between them. Hence, they usually end their statements with the statement: “I don’t know.”

Stage 3. CONTEXTUALISM: relativity of judgments. Typical statements for this stage often begin with the statement: “It depends…”, accompanied by the belief that there are many possible solutions to the problem and that they are all logically equivalent. However, the individual chooses a specific answer or way of thinking from many possible ones, considering them, for some important reason, as better than others in a given situation/task.


1. I do not insist on calling Stage 1 “Formism.” We could call it “logicism” or logical “constructionism.” Due to the numerous paronyms in science, I would like to clarify that by saying by formism I simply mean formal-logical ways of reasoning and solving problems.

The results of the discussed empirical research showed that the development of formal operations in logical and moral reasoning is a necessary, although not sufficient, condition for the development of contextual reasoning: people using contextual ways of reasoning achieved the ability to use formal operations, but not all people achieving the ability to formal thinking used contextual reasoning.

The results of this research also suggested a hypothesis worth testing, that in striving to remove anxiety associated with cognitive uncertainty, an individual looks for pragmatic ways of thinking in solving complex problems.

To my knowledge, the idea of the development of pragmatic thinking after adolescence was first explored in developmental psychology by Labouvie-Vief (1980). She pointed out that while adolescents see possibilities in the real world, adulthood requires a change in the use of logic as a tool in integrating the cognitive-affective complexity of real problems. Further research on her concept of the development of intersystemic integration (e.g. Labouvie-Vief, 2003; see Michalska et al., 2016) suggests that in adulthood something that can be called epistemological “disengagement” gradually occurs – the subject moves away from the context of rational assumptions towards a more intuitive and instrumental treatment of logic in solving problems/tasks.

To sum up, it can be said that people cope with the facts they encounter in life using various cognitive forms/capabilities available at a given age, depending on the needs, goals and values they want to achieve in the short or long term.

Firstly, not only children have difficulties in dealing with facts (due to the limitations of pre-operational forms of cognition), but also adults capable of formal-logical thinking (due to the limitations of classical logic). The reasons for this are different and need to be thoroughly described and understood (the fourth Copernican revolution compared to the three revolutions described by Piaget).

Secondly, people are not immune in their thinking to facts “in general”. They can adjust their way of thinking to the possibilities and regulatory needs in solving real problems/situations (pragmatism in applying logic).

Thirdly, the discovery of cognitive relativity after adolescence and the achievement of the ability to think contextually does not mean that this is the only way of thinking of people or the last stage of cognitive changes possible in ontogeny. Systematic tracking of cognitive changes after adolescence in dealing with facts that occur throughout a person’s life can deepen the understanding of the “logic” of cognitive development.

No “good” theory of behavior and development

In psychology we need a “good” theory, including the psychology of human development, that is, a theory that is not only correct from a formal point of view but also useful in social practice.

What does it matter if a researcher managed to construct a formally “elegant” theory of something that is confirmed, even in the results of well-controlled and replicated experimental studies, if it does not “work” in real situations or simply its functionality and usefulness have not been well-tested in practice?

The reason for people’s loss of trust in facts and scientific knowledge may be the problems of science in dealing with the description of facts and in explaining the studied reality (epistemological perspective).

Reasons for failure

Two reasons are most often given for failures in research on developmental changes (see, e.g., Baltes, 1987; Lerner, 2006; Overton, 2006; 2013; Bornstein, Lamb, 2015; Lerner et al., 2015 et al.):

  • conceptual defects, e.g. the primitive dualism of key problems of traditional developmental psychology regarding the nature of developmental changes, i.e. quantity – quality, continuity – jump, constancy – variability or generality – partiality, which cannot be clearly solved, as well as their mechanisms, i.e. inheritance – environment, maturation – learning;
  • methodological problems in testing models derived from development theory, related to, for example, (a) the mismatch of data measurement and analysis methods to the complex, dynamic field of variability; (b) the excess of data, exceeding the capabilities of their mental and machine processing; (c) with the integration of data of a diverse nature, coming from different levels of the systemic organization of reality.

Effects of failure: Ambiguity of research results

Conceptual and methodological flaws can be considered as underlying the ambiguity of empirical research results.

  • The ambiguity of the results of increasingly frequently undertaken meta-analyses of data reported by various teams of development researchers (e.g. on the effects of cognitive training, Au et al., 2015; Soveri et al., 2017; Sala et al., 2019; Teixeira-Santos, 2019);
  • Recapitulations of over 100 classic psychological studies, including those in developmental psychology (Nosek, 2015), did not confirm the results of the original research, showing the instability of many regularities considered in the psychological literature to be constant, universal and certain.

Such observations allow us to talk about fluctuations in empirical statements and a loss of confidence in the accuracy of scientific knowledge accumulated about changes in human behavior and development.

The effects of failure: The gap between scientific psychology and practice

The ambiguity of empirical research results and doubt in the certainty of scientific knowledge may cause a noticeable gap between scientific psychology and social practice.

…the two most important varieties of psychology: scientific psychology and psychology as a social practice fall into a state of chronic isolation. They stop speaking the same language, they stop using similar tools of knowledge, in short, they stop being able to understand each other. The consequence is not only the growth of easily noticeable mutual prejudices, not only the ghettoization of each of these varieties of psychology, but above all, an escape into folk psychology (Łukaszewski, 2011, p. 17).

This quote points to the widening gap in psychology between scientific theory and social practice. The problem becomes even more complicated when we deepen the analysis of scientific psychology with the issues of the relationship between basic, applied and development research (see Journal of Laws 2020.0.85 of July 20, 2018; criteria for the evaluation of scientific activities). It is difficult to draw strict boundaries between basic, applied and development research. Even basic research may have hallmarks of development work (see the OECD Frascati Manual, 2015).

However, many researchers do not want or do not know how to engage in development research (R & D), and even more so how to implement research results into practice and commercialize them. This lack needs to be made up for in Polish psychology. We forget that the application of research results in practice and development work (R & D) may prove useful in everyday life and increase social trust in theory and scientific knowledge.

“Good” theory

The question arises: Why is the formal correctness of a theory not enough to consider it “good”?

From a scientific point of view, thought/idea/theory is first and basic. It precedes people’s cognition and actions as well as research activities (Brzeziński, 2019; see also in ontogenetic research Karmiloff-Smith, Inhelder, 2006).

However, even the most original and correct theory from a formal point of view does not determine the truthfulness of knowledge on a given topic: two concepts may be correct from a formal point of view, but at the same time they may lead to contradictory (logically inconsistent) conclusions about the same phenomenon or fragment of reality described.

I am inclined to the view that an important criterion of truthfulness is practice, i.e. the experience of applying theory in real action: in individual and social experimentation. I derive this view from, among others, the pragmatic theory of truth (Tatarkiewicz, 1978) and the paradigmatic theory of the development of science (Kuhn, 1968)2.

The proposed discussion on the pragmatic approach in scientific research covers the differences between two positions: logical absolutism and logical pragmatism.

2. See overview: D. McDermid, Pragmatism, Internet Encyclopedias of Philosophy, https:// iep.utm.edu/ (access date: March 17, 2022).

Logical absolutism

This position states that it is not important what the reality is, but what is important is that the principles of classical logic should be used in its description (Wilk, 2017).

Problem-solving is carried out according to the principles of classical (two-valued) logic using socially agreed standards, treated as axioms that do not require justification. As a result, the individual confidently formulates absolute judgments/ answers, rejecting or ignoring other possibilities. It can be assumed that such thinking is characterized by logical absolutism. This position corresponds to Stage 1 of the development of contextual reasoning, which I call formism.

Logical pragmatism

According to this position, what matters is not so much what reality is like, but whether the judgments are functional and useful from the point of view of the values and goals of real action (Wilk, 2017).

There are two premises for the above position (logical pragmatism):

The first can be derived from the postulate of the “pragmatic criterion of truth” by Pepper (1942; after: Wilk, 2017). In this approach, every cognitive system when applied to real problems is based on basic assumptions (ontological and epistemological) that cannot be justified or verified within classical logic, and therefore it cannot be said that one concept is “more true” from another: they can only be rejected or accepted depending on your own assumptions/beliefs.

The second one can be derived from multi-valued logic (e.g. from Zadeh’s concept of fuzzy/indefinite sets; see Wilk, 2017; Malinowski, 2020). The choice of one of the possible judgments/solutions is determined not by whether they are true and justified, but by their degree of justification.

Both premises complement each other: they accept the existence of the real world, emphasizing the limitation of traditional logic to a specific context of expression (see Wieczorek, 2008) and/or conditions for solving the problem (instrumentalism in the application of logic: pragmatic thinking; Labouvie-Vief, 1980). The position of logical pragmatism corresponds to the above-described Stage 3 of the development of contextual thinking, which I call contextualism).

“Good” theory according to Kurt Lewin

In the discussion on the relationship between scientific theory and practice, it is worth recalling Kurt Lewin’s views on “good” theory (1936; 1946).

  • His famous saying that “there is nothing as practical as a good theory”;
  • The proposal of “action research”, indicates mutual, continuous and inseparable connections between theory and practice. The source of theory in a new research area is common knowledge collected on a given topic in everyday observation of the world (see the metaphor of the street researcher G. Kelly, his student), which the researcher formalizes and then checks its usefulness in explaining and predicting behavior in real action of people, introducing systematic modifications in research procedures and theory. Generally speaking, theory is the source of practice, but its application in practice improves theory (and vice versa);
  • The postulate of “field study”: systematic repetition of research in everyday life situations (teaching, work, family, training, etc.) after each introduction of changes improving the theory and/or research procedure, until we decide that the model theoretical is useful in predicting and explaining dynamic changes in the functioning of people and social groups in real situations (ecological validity; see the review of research by Lewin’s successors in: Trempała, Pepitone, Raven, 2006).

To sum up, we can say that research on change in behavior and development in natural operating conditions:

(a) maximize the ecological validity of the theory in describing, explaining, and predicting changes in behavior and human development. They include all variables important in real-life conditions that do not occur in controlled laboratory conditions, or whose actions in real-life situations we sometimes cannot even predict;
(b) they bridge the gap between scientific theory and social practice. They prove that the research process includes both basic research and the implementation of its results into practice, verifying the usefulness of scientific theory in predicting and explaining behavior, but also the usefulness of psychological practices in striving to change behavior and human development.

Final remarks

I see three main benefits of using a pragmatic approach in scientific research:

(a) mastering the epistemological fear of loss and cognitive uncertainty, both in individual human cognitive development and in the process of scientific cognition (Stage 2 of the development of contextual thinking);
(b) deepening the understanding between scientific psychology and practice; (c) increasing public confidence in scientific knowledge.

Does this mean that the neorealist concept of contextual reasoning solves the problem of the cognitive development of an individual after adolescence (in adult-hood), and a “good” theory based on facts collected in a repeatable way in action in the entire field of the variability of everyday situations is the only way to deal with the limitations of traditional logic? I do not know that for sure.

However, I know one thing: it is worth continuing research on the development of post-formal ways of thinking used by adults while testing the usefulness of various research paradigms in predicting and explaining the behavior and development of living organisms. Unlike physical objects, living organisms are in their nature open systems, which is yet another argument pointing to the limitations of classical logic as a universal cognitive tool.

Belief in the universality of two-valued propositional logic is not sufficient to defend the empirical paradigm in the study of human behavior and development.

Translated by Katarzyna Jenek

References

Au, J., Sheehan, E., Tsai, N., Duncan, D.J., Buschkuehl, M., Jaeggi, S.M. (2015). Improving fluid intelligence on working memory training: A meta-analysis. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 22(3), 336–377, doi: 10.3758/s13423-014-0699-4

Baltes, P.B. (1987). Theoretical proposition of life span developmental psychology: On the dynamic between growth and decline. Developmental Psychology, 23, 611–626.

Basseches, M.A. (1980). Dialectical schemata: A framework for the empirical study of the development of dialectical thinking. Human Development, 23, 400–421.

Bornstein, M.H., Lamb, M.E. (red.), (2015). Developmental science: An advanced text-book. New York – London: Psychology Press, Taylor & Fransis Group.

Brzeziński, J. (2019). Metodologia badań psychologicznych. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN.

Commons, M., Richards F., Kuhn D. (1982). Systematic and metasystematic reasoning: A case for level of reasoning beyond Piaget’s stage of formal operations. Child Development, 53, 1058–1069.

Gilligan, C., Murphy, J. (1979). Development from adolescence to adulthood: The philosopher and the dilemma of the fact. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, 9(5), 85–99, doi: 10.1002/cd.23219790507

Kahneman, D. (2012). Pułapki myślenia. O myśleniu szybkim i wolnym. Poznań: Media Rodzina.

Karmiloff-Smith, A., Inhelder, B. (2006). If you want to get ahead, get a theory? W: J.G. Bremmer, C. Lewis (red.), Developmental psychology. Perceptual and cognitive development (t. 3, s. 355–371). London – Thousand Oaks – New Dehli: SAGE Publications.

Kruglanski, A.W., Ajzen, I. (1983). Bias and error in human judgment. European Journal of Social Psychology, 13(1), 1–44, doi: 10.1002/ejsp.2420130102

Kuhn, T.S. (1968). Struktura rewolucji naukowych. Warszawa: Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe.

Labouvie-Vief, G. (1980). Beyond formal operations: Uses and limits of pure logic in life-span development. Human Development, 23(3), 141–161, doi: 10.1159/000272546

Labouvie-Vief, G. (2003). Dynamic integration: Affect, cognition, and the self in adulthood. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 12, 201–206, doi: 10.1046/ j.0963-7214.2003.01262.x

Ledzińska, M. (2002). Stres informacyjny jako zagrożenie dla rozwoju. Roczniki Psychologiczne, 5, 77–97.

Ledzińska, M. (2020). Od informacji do wiedzy w dobie globalizacji. W: H. Liberska, J. Trempała (red.), Psychologia wychowania. Wybrane problemy (s. 121–132). Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN.

Lerner, R.M. (2006). Developmental science, developmental systems, and contemporary theories of human development. W: W. Damon, R.M. Lerner (red.), Handbook of child psychology: Theoretical models of human development (t. 1, s. 1–17). Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons.

Lerner, R.M., Hershberg, R.M., Hilliard, L.J., Johnson, S.K. (2015). Concepts and Theories of Human Development. W: M.H. Bornstein, M.E. Lamb (red.), Developmental Science: An Advanced Textbook (s. 3–42). New York – London: Psychology Press.

Lerner, R.M., Hultsch D.F. (2003). Human Development. A life-span perspective. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company.

Lewicka, M. (1993). Aktor czy obserwator. Psychologiczne mechanizmy odchyleń od racjonalności w myśleniu potocznym. Warszawa – Olsztyn: Polskie Towarzystwo Psychologiczne, Pracownia Wydawnicza.

Lewin, K. (1936/1966). Principles of topological psychology. New York – Toronto – London – Sydney: McGraw-Hill Book Company.

Lewin, K. (1946). Behavior and development as a function of the total situation. W: L. Carmichael (red.), Manual of child psychology (s. 791–844). New York: John Wiley and Sons Inc.

Łukaszewski, W. (2011). Nauka podzielona. Nauka, 4, 7–19.

Malinowski, G. (2020). Logiki wielowartościowe. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN.

Marmion, J.F. (2019). Głupota. Nieoficjalna biografia. Wydawnictwo Dolnośląskie.

Mądrzycki, T. (1986). Deformacje w spostrzeganiu. Warszawa: Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe.

Michalska, P., Szymanik-Kostrzewska, A., Gurba E., Trempała, J. (2016). Rozwój myślenia w dorosłości: o sposobach badania rozumowania postformalnego w codziennych sytuacjach. Psychologia Rozwojowa, 21(2), 55–71, doi: 10.4467/ 20843879PR.16.010.5088

Nosek, B. (2015). Estimating reproducibility of psychological science. Science, 349(6251).

Obuchowski, K. (1997). Zmiany osobowości – założenia i tezy. Forum Psychologiczne, 2(2), 22–30.

Overton, W.F. (2006). Developmental psychology: philosophy, concepts, methodology. W: W. Damon, R.M. Lerner (red.), Handbook of child psychology: Theoretical models of human development (t. 1, s. 18–88). Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons.

Overton, W.F. (2013). Relationism and relational developmental system. A paradigm for developmental science in the post-Cartesian era. W: R.M. Lerner, J.B. Benson (red.), Advances in Child Development and Behavior. Embodiment and Epigenesist: Theoretical and Methodological Issues in Understanding the Role of Biology within the Relational Developmental System. Part A (t. 44, s. 24–64). Oxford: Elsevier.

Pepper, S.C. (1942). World hypotheses: A study in evidence. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Perry, W. (1970). Forms of intellectual and ethical development in the college years. New York: Holt, Rinehart, Winston.

Phillips, T. (2020). Prawda. Krótka historia wciskania kitu. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Albatros.

Riegel, K.F. (1975). Toward dialectical theory of development. Human Development, 18, 50–64.

Sala, G., Aksayli, N.D., Tatlidil, K.S., Gondo, Y., Gobet, F. (2019). Working memory training does not enhance older adults’ cognitive skills: A comprehensive meta-analysis. Intelligence, 77, Article 101386, doi: 10.1016/j.intell.2019.101386

Schommer, M. (1990). Effects of beliefs about the nature of knowledge on comprehension. Journal of Educational Psychology, 82(3), 498–504.

Siegel, L.S., Brainerd, Ch.J. (red.), (1978). Alternatives to Piaget. Critical essays on the theory. New York: Academic Press.

Sinnot, J.D. (1984), Postformal reasoning the relativistic stage. W: M.L. Commons, F.A. Richards, C. Armon (red.), Beyond Formal Operations: Late Adolescent and Adult Cognitive Development (s. 298–326). New York: Praeger.

Sinnot, J.D. (1998). The Development of Logic in Adulthood: Postformal Thought and Its Applications. New York: Plenum Press.

Soveri, A., Antfolk, J., Karlsson, L., Salo, B., Laine, M. (2017). Working memory training revisited: A multi-level meta-analysis of n-back training studies. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 24(4), 1077–1096, doi: 10.3758/s13423-016-1217-0

Tatarkiewicz, W. (1978). Historia filozofii. T. 3. Warszawa: Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe.

Teixeira-Santos, A.C., Moreira, C.S., Magalhães, R., Magalhães, C., Pereira, D.R., Leite, J., Carvalho, S., Sampaio, A. (2019). Reviewing working memory training gains in healthy older adults: A meta-analytic review of transfer for cognitive outcomes. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 103, 163–177, doi: 10.1016/ j.neubiorev.2019.05.009

Trempała, J. (1986). Rozwój poznawczy w dorosłości. Kontynuacja rozwoju operacji formalnych czy kształtowanie się nowych jakości poznania. Przegląd Psychologiczny, 29(1), 9–23.

Trempała, J. (1989). Rozumowanie w okresie wczesnej dorosłości. Warszawa – Poznań: Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe.

Trempała, J. (1993). Rozumowanie moralne i odporność dzieci na pokusę oszustwa. Bydgoszcz: Wydawnictwo Uczelniane WSP.

Trempała, J. (2017). Towards the “good” human development theory. Studia Psychologiczne, 55(2), 44–51, doi: 10.2478/V1067-010-0175-4

Trempała, J. (2021). O zachowaniu i rozwoju człowieka. Bydgoszcz: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Kazimierza Wielkiego.

Trempała, J., Pepitone, A., Raven, B.H. (red.), (2006). Lewinian Psychology. Bydgoszcz: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Kazimierza Wielkiego.

Wieczorek, R. (2008). Kontekstualizm i antyrealizm. Próba porównania. Filozofia Nauki, 16(3–4), 63–64.

Wilk, A. (2017). Absolutyzm logiczny a ontologia. Filozofia i Nauka. Studia filozoficzne i interdycyplinarne, 5, 289–297.


WERSJA PL

Artykuł jest dostępny na warunkach międzynarodowej licencji 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0).

Wprowadzenie

Tytuł wykładu może intrygować, a nawet budzić opór. Obejmuje bowiem utrwaloną w powszechnym myśleniu relację sprzeczności między wiarą i naukowym obrazem świata.

W wykładzie nawiązuję do krytyki empiryzmu przedstawionej przez Adama Niemczyńskiego, inicjującego dyskusję panelową o teorii rozwoju człowieka na forum 24. Ogólnopolskiej Konferencji Psychologów Rozwoju (UKSW, Warszawa, 2015).

W pierwszym panelu zorganizowanym przez Adama Niemczyńskiego opowiedziałem się zdecydowanie za empiryzmem w psychologii (zob. Trempała, 2017). Proszę traktować tytuł tego wykładu jako intelektualną prowokację. Nie zmieniłem poglądów na temat znaczenia faktów empirycznych w poznaniu naukowym. Zastanawiam się jednak nad ograniczeniami poznania naukowego oraz ich konsekwencjami.

Kiedyś niepokoił psychologię brak jednej, ogólnej i wyczerpującej teorii zachowania i rozwoju człowieka. Dzisiaj niepokoić zaczyna coś innego. O ile nowożytna nauka oparta jest na przekonaniu o „sile rozumu” oraz o uniwersalnej doskonałości zasad logiki formalnej w opisywaniu i wyjaśnianiu rzeczywistości, to jednak wiele wskazuje, że współcześnie, mimo coraz lepszego wykształcenia i szerszego dostępu ludzi do informacji, a może właśnie z tego powodu, spada społeczne zaufanie do nauki opartej na faktach.

Ogólnie mówiąc, w życiu społecznym obserwujemy coraz więcej oznak utraty oświeceniowego szacunku do wiedzy naukowej. Opór przed oświeceniem nie jest nowy. Ma swoją historię. Zmieniają się jego przejawy (Philips, 2020). Współcześnie zjawisko to wyraża się m.in.:

  • we wzroście popularności teorii spiskowych związanych z lenistwem intelektualnym użytkowników Internetu, taplających się w bzdurach i półprawdach (co wzmacnia odchylenia od racjonalności),
  • w coraz bardziej bezczelnych i bezkarnych kłamstwach, intelektualnych oszustwach oraz manipulacjach świadomością społeczną dla realizacji celów bieżącej polityki i potrzeb marketingowych (co wzmacnia odporność na fakty, wyrażającą się w skłonności do odrzucania wiedzy opartej na faktach),
  • w spadku autorytetu uczonych, wdających się czasami w bezmyślne debaty medialne, w których uczeni nie potrafią poradzić sobie z nieuzasadnionymi, przypadkowymi asocjacjami ich uczestników (co ujawnia jakąś lukę między wiedzą naukową i potoczną).

Mówimy, że żyjemy w epoce postprawdy. Termin ten został ogłoszony przez redakcję Oxford Dictionaries słowem roku 2016, a samo zjawisko staje się ostatnio przedmiotem badań empirycznych i całkiem poważnych analiz w naukach społecznych (zob. np. Marmion, 2019; Phillips, 2020).

W tym kontekście nasuwają się dwa pytania:

(1) Skąd bierze się odporność ludzi na fakty, wyrażająca się w skłonności do odrzucania wiedzy opartej na faktach, odchylenia od racjonalności i obserwowana nieufność, a nawet ignorancja wiedzy naukowej?

(2) Nie mniej ważne jest pytanie, co to oznacza dla dyscyplin naukowych, w których uczeni gromadzą fakty i na ich podstawie opisują obraz świata oraz poszukują zastosowań wiedzy naukowej w praktyce społecznej?

Znalezienie odpowiedzi na te pytania nie jest łatwe. Przekracza bowiem granice jednej dyscypliny. Wydaje się jednak, że przekonanie o „sile rozumu” ludzkiego i o racjonalnym porządku świata nie wystarczy w znalezieniu wyczerpujących

Niemniej pytania te stawiam w centrum uwagi prezentowanego wykładu. Z konieczności ograniczę się do kwestii, które są mi bliskie jako psychologa rozwoju. Źródeł spadku społecznego zaufania do teorii opartej na faktach i wiedzy naukowej poszukiwać będę w dwóch obszarach: (a) kształtowania się postformalnych sposobów myślenia w rozwoju poznawczym jednostki (na poziomie ontogenetycznym) oraz (b) braku „dobrej” teorii zachowania i rozwoju człowieka w psychologii (na poziomie epistemologicznym).

Rozwój myślenia logicznego

Rozpocznę od problemu rozwoju poznawczego w ontogenezie. Krótko zajmę się tezą, że: Indywidualny rozwój poznawczy jednostki nie przebiega wyłącznie w kierunku coraz doskonalszych form myślenia logicznego i nie kończy się w adolescencji wraz z osiągnięciem zdolności do stosowania formalnych operacji logicznych.

Jean Piaget utrwalił w psychologii przekonanie, że rozwój poznawczy dzieci i młodzieży przebiega w uniwersalnej, koniecznej i niezmiennej sekwencji od inteligencji sensomotorycznej (0), poprzez przedoperacyjne wyobrażenia (I) oraz operacje konkretne (II), do logicznych operacji formalnych (III), które ulegają konsolidacji w okresie adolescencji (IIIB). Stadium to Piaget utożsamiał z dojrzałością i końcem rozwoju poznawczego ludzi, a tak naprawdę – genezy poznania naukowego, co było podstawowym celem jego wielkiego projektu badawczego.

Przekornie zapytam: cóż z tego, że jednostka osiąga zdolność do posługiwania się skonsolidowanymi sposobami rozumowania formalno-logicznego, skoro często okazują się one bezużyteczne w rozwiązywaniu problemów napotykanych w życiu codziennym.

Podkreślić należy, że do dnia dzisiejszego nikt nie podważył opisanej przez Piageta sekwencji zmian w rozwoju rozumowania logicznego dzieci i młodzieży. Wątpliwości dotyczą jedynie:

(a) granic wiekowych oraz
(b) tego, co dzieje się w rozwoju poznawczym jednostki po adolescencji, po osiągnięciu zdolności do rozumowania formalno-logicznego.

Pod koniec XX wieku lawinowo zaczęła wzrastać liczba doniesień empirycznych, których autorzy dowodzili, że po adolescencji kształtują się pozaoperacyjne lub postformalne sposoby poznania.

Wywiązał się niezwykle ciekawy spór, czy identyfikowane w dorosłości sposoby myślenia, np. relatywistycznego (Perry, 1970; Sinnot, 1984; 1998), dialektycznego (Riegel, 1975; Basseches, 1980), albo intersystemowego (Labouvie-Vief, 1980; 2003) czy matasystemowego (Commons, Richards, Kuhn, 1982), są wyrazem: (a) stanowiska rewizjonistycznego: o jakościowo nowych w stosunku do piagetowskich form poznania, kształtujących się po adolescencji w rozwoju człowieka (np. myślenia relatywistycznego czy dialektycznego), czy też (b) stanowiska zachowawczego: dalszego rozwoju opisanych przez Piageta operacji formalnych, ich dalszego konsolidowania się (np. metasystemowego – logiki wyższego rzędu niż opisana przez Piageta).

W swoich badaniach w tym obszarze początkowo opowiedziałem się za stanowiskiem rewizjonistycznym, w przekonaniu, że rozwój poznawczy nie ma jednowymiarowego charakteru, zgodnie z opisanym przez Piageta kierunkiem kształtowania się rozumowania logicznego, i nie kończy się w adolescencji (Trempała, 1986; 1989). Równocześnie moje przekonanie o sile rozumu i użyteczności rozumowania logicznego w rozwiązywaniu realnych problemów zaczęło słabnąć w wyniku badań nad odpornością na pokusę oszustwa dzieci i młodzieży (Trempała, 1993). W eksperymencie naturalnym dowiodłem, że odporność na oszustwa wzrasta nie tylko wraz z poziomem rozwoju rozumowania logicznego i moralnego badanych, ale zależy także od sytuacji pokusy: Nie ma ludzi uczciwych w ogóle, są uczciwi w zależności od sytuacji.

Moje wątpliwości pogłębiły sugestie wielu badaczy, że postęp edukacyjny i technologiczny poszerzył dostęp ludzi do informacji, jednak ich nadmiar przekracza możliwości poznawcze jednostki w spójnym ich ujęciu: (a) nasila wrażenie chaosu (Obuchowski, 1997) i stres informacyjny (Ledzińska, 2002); (b) generuje niepewność poznawczą i odstępstwa od racjonalności, wyrażające się w tendencyjności i błędach poznawczych opisanych np. w psychologii społecznej (zob. Kruglanski, Ajzen, 1983; Kahneman, 2012, a w polskiej literaturze: Mądrzycki, 1986; Lewicka, 1993 i in.).

Dzisiaj nie jestem pewny, czy odrzucenie stanowiska zachowawczego jest błędem. Skłaniam się ku stanowisku integracyjnemu. Dostrzegam racje Piageta, ale i jego ówczesnych krytyków, wskazujących na alternatywne drogi rozwoju poznawczego (zob. np. Siegel, Brainerd, 1978; Labouvie-Vief, 1980; 2003).

Zastanawiając się nad źródłami kłopotów ludzi w radzeniu sobie z faktami, skoncentrowałem uwagę na dwóch kwestiach:

  • Kontekstualna natura poznania ludzkiego. Poznanie jest możliwe jedynie w kontekście określonego układu poznawczego (np. punktu widzenia, perspektywy poznawczej czy założeń leżących u podstaw wyrażanych sądów i ich uzasadnienia);
  • Ograniczenia systemów logicznych w usuwaniu niepewności poznawczej związanej z wielością możliwych sądów/rozwiązań zależnych od przyjętego kontekstu poznawczego.

Rozwój myślenia kontekstualnego

W swoich badaniach nad rozwojem rozumowania kontekstualnego w okresie wczesnej dorosłości (Trempała, 1989) zastosowałem 9-stopniową skalę Gilligan i Marphy’ego (1979) operacjonalizującą koncepcję zaangażowania epistemicznego Perry’ego (1970).

Ponieważ miałem kłopoty z jednoznaczną identyfikacją określonych stadiów/ faz, wyróżniłem trzy stadia rozumowania kontekstualnego zgodnie z trzema kategoriami grupującymi dziewięć poziomów wzrostu zaangażowania epistemicznego Perry’ego (1970): (a) zmodyfikowany dualizm sądów; (b) odkryty relatywizm; (c) rozwinięte zaangażowanie w relatywizm (zob. dyskusję: Schommer, 1990).


Stadia rozwoju rozumowania kontekstualnego

(Trempała, 2021, s. 96–99)

Stadium 1. FORMIZM1: absolutyzm i pewność sądów. Absolutne sądy i jednoznaczne rozwiązania z odwołaniem się do autorytetów lub standardów określonych przez autorytety. Wypowiedzi zawierają często sprzeczne sądy i/lub ich uzasadnienia. Jednostka nie jest świadoma ich sprzeczności i unika dyskusji nad alternatywnością sądów/rozwiązań problemu.

Stadium 2. NIEPEWNOŚĆ: świadomość sprzeczności sądów i zagubienie. Typowe wypowiedzi dla tego stadium rozpoczynają się często od stwierdzenia: „i tak…, i… nie”. Jednostka formułuje sprzeczne sądy, ma świadomość ich sprzeczności, ale jej nie rozumie i nie potrafi rozstrzygnąć. Jeśli nawet potrafi uzasadnić oddzielnie każdy ze sprzecznych kierunków sądów, to nie jest jednak zdolna dokonać wyboru między nimi. Stąd wypowiedzi kończy zwykle stwierdzeniem: „Nie wiem”. Stadium 3. KONTEKSTUALIZM: względność sądów. Typowe wypowiedzi dla tego stadium rozpoczynają się często od stwierdzenia: „To zależy…”, któremu towarzyszy przekonanie, że istnieje wiele możliwych rozwiązań problemu oraz że wszystkie one są równowartościowe z logicznego punktu widzenia. Jednostka wybiera jednak z wielu możliwych określoną odpowiedź lub sposób myślenia, uznając je z jakiegoś ważnego dla siebie powodu jako lepsze od innych w danej sytuacji/zadaniu.


1. Nie upieram się w nazywaniu Stadium 1. „Formizmem”. Moglibyśmy nazwać je „logicyzmem” lub logicznym „konstrukcjonizmem”. Ze względu na liczne w nauce paroni-my chciałbym wyjaśnić, że mówiąc o formizmie, mam na myśli po prostu formalno-logiczne sposoby rozumowania i rozwiązywania problemów.

Wyniki omawianych badań empirycznych wykazały, że rozwój operacji formalnych w rozumowaniu logicznym i moralnym jest warunkiem koniecznym, choć niewystarczającym kształtowania się rozumowania kontekstualnego: osoby stosujące kontekstualne sposoby rozumowania osiągały zdolność do stosowania operacji formalnych, ale nie wszystkie osoby osiągające zdolność do myślenia formalnego stosowały rozumowanie kontekstualne.

Wyniki tych badań nasunęły ponadto hipotezę, którą warto sprawdzić, że w dążeniu do usuwania niepokoju związanego z niepewnością poznawczą jednostka poszukuje pragmatycznych sposobów myślenia w rozwiązaniu złożonych problemów.

Wedle mojej wiedzy, ideę rozwoju myślenia pragmatycznego po adolescencji podjęła jako pierwsza w psychologii rozwoju Labouvie-Vief (1980). Zwróciła uwagę, że o ile adolescenci dostrzegają w realnym świecie możliwości, to dorosłość wymaga zmiany w stosowaniu logiki jako narzędzia w integrowaniu poznawczo-afektywnej złożoności realnych problemów. Dalsze badania nad jej koncepcją rozwoju intersystemowej integracji (np. Labouvie-Vief, 2003; zob. Michalska i in., 2016) sugerują, że w dorosłości stopniowo dochodzi do czegoś, co można nazwać epistemologicznym „odangażowaniem” się podmiotu od kontekstu racjonalnych założeń w kierunku bardziej intuicyjnego i instrumentalnego traktowania logiki w rozwiązywaniu problemów/zadań.

Podsumowując, można powiedzieć, że ludzie radzą sobie z napotykanymi w życiu faktami, wykorzystując różne, dostępne w danym wieku formy/możliwości poznawcze stosownie do potrzeb, celów i wartości, które chcą osiągnąć w krótszej lub dłuższej perspektywie czasowej.

Po pierwsze, trudności w radzeniu sobie z faktami mają nie tylko dzieci (ze względu na ograniczenia przedoperacyjnych form poznania), ale także dorośli, zdolni do myślenia formalno-logicznego (ze względu na ograniczenia klasycznej logiki). Inne są tego przyczyny, które trzeba rzetelnie opisać i zrozumieć (czwartą rewolucję kopernikańską w stosunku do trzech opisanych przez Piageta).

Po drugie, ludzie w swoim myśleniu nie są odporni na fakty „w ogóle”. Potrafią dopasować sposób myślenia do możliwości i potrzeb regulacyjnych w rozwiązywaniu realnych problemów/sytuacji (pragmatyzm w stosowaniu logiki).

Po trzecie, odkrycie po adolescencji poznawczej względności i osiągnięcie zdolności do myślenia kontekstualnego nie oznacza, że jest to jedyny sposób myślenia ludzi lub ostatni etap możliwych w ontogenezie zmian poznawczych. Systematyczne śledzenie zmian poznawczych po adolescencji w radzeniu sobie z faktami, jakie zachodzą w ciągu dalszego życia człowieka, może pogłębić zrozumienie „logiki” rozwoju poznawczego.

Brak „dobrej” teorii zachowania i rozwoju

Potrzebujemy w psychologii, w tym w psychologii rozwoju człowieka, „dobrej” teorii, tj. teorii nie tylko poprawnej z formalnego punktu widzenia, ale także użytecznej w praktyce społecznej.

Cóż z tego, że badaczowi udało się skonstruować formalnie „elegancką” teorię czegoś, która uzyskuje potwierdzenie, nawet w wynikach dobrze kontrolowanych i replikowanych badaniach eksperymentalnych, jeśli nie „działa” ona w realnych sytuacjach, lub po prostu nie została dobrze sprawdzona jej funkcjonalność i użyteczność w praktyce.

Powodem utraty zaufania ludzi do faktów i wiedzy naukowej mogą być problemy nauki w radzeniu sobie z opisem faktów i w wyjaśnianiu badanej rzeczywistości (perspektywa epistemologiczna).

Przyczyny niepowodzeń

Najczęściej wskazywane są dwa powody niepowodzeń w badaniach nad zmianami rozwojowymi (zob. np. Baltes, 1987; Lerner, 2006; Overton, 2006; 2013; Bornstein, Lamb, 2015; Lerner i in., 2015 i in.):

  • wady koncepcyjne, np. niedający się jednoznacznie rozwiązać prymitywny dualizm kluczowych problemów tradycyjnej psychologii rozwojowej na temat natury zmian rozwojowych, tj. ilość – jakość, ciągłość – skokowość, stałość – zmienność czy ogólność – parcjalność, a także ich mechanizmów, tj. dziedziczenie – środowisko, dojrzewanie – uczenie się;
  • problemy metodologiczne w testowaniu modeli wyprowadzonych z teorii rozwoju, wiążących się np. (a) z niedopasowaniem metod pomiaru i analizy danych do złożonego, dynamicznego pola zmienności; (b) z nadmiarem danych, przekraczającym możliwości ich umysłowego i maszynowego przetwarzania; (c) z integracją danych o zróżnicowanej naturze, pochodzących z różnych poziomów systemowej organizacji rzeczywistości.

Skutki niepowodzeń: niejednoznaczność wyników badań

Wady koncepcyjne i metodologiczne uznać można jako leżące u podstaw niejednoznaczności wyników badań empirycznych.

  • Niejednoznaczność wyników coraz częściej podejmowanych metaanaliz danych raportowanych przez różne zespoły badaczy rozwojowych (np. nad efektami treningu poznawczego, Au i in., 2015; Soveri i in., 2017; Sala i in., 2019; Teixeira-Santos, 2019);
  • Rekapitulacje ponad 100 klasycznych badań psychologicznych, w tym w psychologii rozwoju (Nosek, 2015), które nie potwierdziły wyników badań oryginalnych, pokazując niestabilność wielu prawidłowości uznawanych w literaturze psychologicznej za stałe, uniwersalne i pewne.

Tego rodzaju spostrzeżenia pozwalają mówić o fluktuacji stwierdzeń empirycznych i utracie pewności w trafność wiedzy naukowej gromadzonej na temat zmian w zachowaniu i rozwoju człowieka.

Skutki niepowodzeń: luka między psychologią naukową i praktyką

Niejednoznaczność wyników badań empirycznych i zwątpienie w pewność wiedzy naukowej może powodować zauważalną lukę między psychologią naukową i praktyką społeczną.

…dwie najważniejsze odmiany psychologii: psychologia naukowa i psychologia jako praktyka społeczna popadają w stan chronicznej izolacji. Przestają mówić tym samym językiem, przestają korzystać z podobnych narzędzi poznania, słowem

– przestają być zdolne do wzajemnego rozumienia się. Konsekwencją jest nie tylko narastanie łatwo zauważalnych wzajemnych uprzedzeń, nie tylko gettoizacja każdej z tych odmian psychologii, ale przede wszystkim ucieczka w psychologię potoczną (Łukaszewski, 2011, s. 17).

Cytat ten wskazuje na pogłębiającą się w psychologii lukę między teorią naukową a praktyką społeczną. Problem jeszcze bardziej się komplikuje, gdy analizę psychologii naukowej pogłębimy o kwestie związków między badaniami podstawowymi, stosowanymi i rozwojowymi (zob. Dz.U.2020.0.85 z dnia 20 lipca 2018 r.; kryteria ewaluacji działalności naukowej). Trudno jest bowiem wyznaczyć ścisłe granice między badaniami podstawowymi, stosowanymi i rozwojowymi. Znamiona prac rozwojowych mogą mieć nawet badania podstawowe (zob. Podręcznik OECD Frascati, 2015).

Jednakże wielu badaczy nie chce lub nie wie, jak zabrać się do badań rozwojowych (B + R), a tym bardziej, jak zająć się wdrożeniem wyników badań naukowych do praktyki i ich komercjalizacją. Ten brak należy w polskiej psychologii nadrobić. Zapominamy, że zastosowania wyników badań w praktyce i prace rozwojowe (B + R) mogą okazać się użyteczne w codziennym życiu oraz podnieść zaufanie społeczne do teorii i wiedzy naukowej.

„Dobra” teoria

Pojawia się pytanie: Dlaczego formalna poprawność teorii nie wystarczy, aby uznać ją za „dobrą”?

Z naukowego punktu widzenia, myśl/idea/teoria jest pierwsza i podstawowa. Poprzedza poznanie i działanie ludzi oraz czynności badawcze (Brzeziński, 2015; zob. także w badaniach ontogenetycznych Karmiloff-Smith, Inhelder, 2006).

Jednakże teoria nawet najbardziej oryginalna i poprawna z formalnego punktu widzenia nie rozstrzyga o prawdziwości wiedzy na dany temat: dwie koncepcje mogą być poprawne z formalnego punktu widzenia, lecz równocześnie mogą prowadzić do sprzecznych (niespójnych logicznie) wniosków na temat tego samego zjawiska czy opisywanego fragmentu rzeczywistości.

Skłaniam się ku poglądowi, że ważnym kryterium prawdziwości jest praktyka, czyli doświadczenie stosowania teorii w realnym działaniu: w indywidualnym i społecznym eksperymentowaniu. Pogląd ten wywodzę m.in. z pragmatycznej teorii prawdy (Tatarkiewicz, 1978) oraz paradygmatycznej teorii rozwoju nauki (Kuhn, 1968)2.

2. Zob. przegląd: D. McDermid, Pragmatism, Internet Encyclopedy of Philosophy, https:// iep.utm.edu/ (data dostępu: 17.03.2022).

Proponowana dyskusja nad podejściem pragmatycznym w badaniach naukowych obejmuje różnice między dwoma stanowiskami: absolutyzmem logicznym oraz pragmatyzmem logicznym.

Absolutyzm logiczny

Stanowisko to głosi, że nie jest istotne, jaka rzeczywistość jest, natomiast ważne jest, że w jej opisie stosować należy zasady logiki klasycznej (Wilk, 2017).

Rozwiązywanie problemów przebiega według zasad logiki klasycznej (dwuwartościowej) z wykorzystaniem uzgodnionych społecznie standardów, traktowanych jako aksjomaty niewymagające uzasadnienia. W efekcie jednostka w sposób pewny formułuje bezwzględne sądy/odpowiedzi, odrzucając lub ignorując inne możliwości. Można przyjąć, że takie myślenie charakteryzuje absolutyzm logiczny. Stawisko to odpowiada Stadium 1. rozwoju rozumowania kontekstualnego, nazwanego przeze mnie formizmem.

Pragmatyzm logiczny

Zgodnie z tym stanowiskiem, istotne jest nie tyle to, jaka jest rzeczywistość, ile to, czy sądy są funkcjonalne i użyteczne z punktu widzenia wartości i celów realnego działania (Wilk, 2017).

Można wskazać dwie przesłanki powyższego stanowiska (pragmatyzmu logicznego):

Pierwszą możemy wyprowadzić z postulatu „pragmatycznego kryterium prawdy” Peppera (1942; za: Wilk, 2017). W ujęciu tym każdy system poznawczy w zastosowaniu do realnych problemów opiera się na podstawowych założeniach (ontologicznych i epistemologicznych), które nie dają się uzasadnić czy zweryfikować w ramach klasycznej logiki, i dlatego nie można powiedzieć, że jedna koncepcja jest „bardziej prawdziwa” od innej: można je tylko odrzucić lub przyjąć w zależności od własnych założeń/przekonań.

Drugą możemy wyprowadzić z logiki wielowartościowej (np. z koncepcji zbiorów rozmytych/nieokreślonych Zadeha; zob. Wilk, 2017; Malinowski, 2020). O wyborze jednego z możliwych sądów/rozwiązań decyduje nie tyle to, czy są one prawdziwe i uzasadnione, ile jaki jest stopień ich uzasadnienia.

Obie przesłanki uzupełniają się: akceptują istnienie realnego świata, podkreślając ograniczenie tradycyjnej logiki do określonego kontekstu wypowiedzi (zob. Wieczorek, 2008) i/lub warunków rozwiązania problemu (instrumentalizm w stosowaniu logiki: myślenie pragmatyczne; Labouvie-Vief, 1980). Stanowisko pragmatyzmu logicznego odpowiada opisanemu wyżej Stadium 3. rozwoju myślenia kontekstualnego, nazwane przeze mnie kontekstualizmem).

„Dobra” teoria w ujęciu Kurta Lewina

W dyskusji nad relacjami między teorią naukową i praktyką warto przypomnieć poglądy Kurta Lewina na temat „dobrej” teorii (1936; 1946).

  • Jego słynne powiedzenie, że „nie ma nic bardziej praktycznego niż dobra teoria”;
  • Propozycję „badań w działaniu” (action research), która wskazuje na wzajemne, ciągłe i nierozerwalne związki między teorią i praktyką. Źródłem teorii w nowym obszarze badawczym jest wiedza potoczna gromadzona na dany temat w codziennej obserwacji świata (zob. metafora badacza z ulicy G. Kelly’go, jego studenta), którą badacz formalizuje, następnie sprawdza jej użyteczność w wyjaśnianiu i predykcji zachowania w realnym działaniu ludzi, wprowadzając systematyczne modyfikacje w postępowaniu badawczym i teorii. Ogólnie mówiąc, źródłem praktyki jest teoria, ale jej stosowanie w praktyce doskonali teorię (i odwrotnie);
  • Postulat „badań polowych” (field study): systematycznego powtarzania badań w codziennych sytuacjach życiowych (nauczania, pracy, rodziny, treningu itp.) po każdym wprowadzeniu zmian doskonalących teorię i/lub postępowanie badawcze dopóki nie uznamy, że model teoretyczny jest użyteczny w przewidywaniu i wyjaśnianiu dynamicznych zmian w funkcjonowaniu ludzi i grup społecznych w realnych sytuacjach (trafność ekologiczna; zob. przegląd badań następców Lewina w: Trempała, Pepitone, Raven, 2006).

Podsumowując, można powiedzieć, że badania nad zmianą w zachowaniu i rozwoju w naturalnych warunkach działania:

(a) maksymalizują trafność ekologiczną teorii w opisywaniu, wyjaśnianiu i predykcji zmian w zachowaniu oraz w rozwoju człowieka. Obejmują wszystkie zmienne istotne w realnych warunkach życiowych, które nie występują w kontrolowanych warunkach laboratoryjnych, lub których działania w sytuacjach życiowych czasami nawet nie jesteśmy w stanie przewidzieć;
(b) zasypują lukę między teorią naukową i praktyką społeczną. Dowodzą, że proces badawczy obejmuje zarówno badania podstawowe, jak i wdrożenie ich wyników do praktyki, weryfikując użyteczność teorii naukowej w predykcji i wyjaśnianiu zachowania, a także użyteczność praktyk psychologicznych w dążeniu do zmiany w zachowaniu i rozwoju człowieka.

Uwagi końcowe

Dostrzegam trzy podstawowe korzyści płynące ze stosowania podejścia pragmatycznego w badaniach naukowych:

(a) opanowanie epistemologicznej trwogi w zagubieniu i niepewności poznawczej, zarówno w indywidulanym rozwoju poznawczym człowieka, jak i w procesie poznania naukowego (Stadium 2. rozwoju myślenia kontekstualnego);
(b) pogłębienie zrozumienia między psychologią naukową i praktyką;
(c) zwiększenie zaufania społecznego do wiedzy naukowej.

Czy to oznacza, że neorealistyczna koncepcja rozumowania kontekstualnego rozwiązuje problem rozwoju poznawczego jednostki po adolescencji (w dorosłości), a „dobra” teoria oparta na faktach gromadzonych w sposób powtarzalny w działaniu w całym polu zmienności codziennych sytuacji jest jedynym sposobem na radzenie sobie z ograniczeniami tradycyjnej logiki? Tego na pewno nie wiem.

Wiem jednak jedno: że warto kontynuować badania nad rozwojem postformalnych sposobów myślenia, które stosują ludzie dorośli, testując równocześnie użyteczność różnych paradygmatów badawczych w przewidywaniu i wyjaśnianiu zachowania i rozwoju organizmów żywych. W przeciwieństwie do obiektów fizycznych, organizmy żywe są w swej naturze systemami otwartymi, co jest jeszcze jednym argumentem wskazującym na ograniczenia klasycznej logiki jako uniwersalnego narzędzia poznawczego.

Wiara w uniwersalność dwuwartościowej logiki zdaniowej nie jest wystarczająca w obronie paradygmatu empirycznego w badaniach nad zachowaniem i rozwojem człowieka.

Literatura cytowana

Au, J., Sheehan, E., Tsai, N., Duncan, D.J., Buschkuehl, M., Jaeggi, S.M. (2015). Improving fluid intelligence on working memory training: A meta-analysis. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 22(3), 336–377, doi: 10.3758/s13423-014-0699-4

Baltes, P.B. (1987). Theoretical proposition of life span developmental psychology: On the dynamic between growth and decline. Developmental Psychology, 23, 611–626.

Basseches, M.A. (1980). Dialectical schemata: A framework for the empirical study of the development of dialectical thinking. Human Development, 23, 400–421.

Bornstein, M.H., Lamb, M.E. (red.), (2015). Developmental science: An advanced text-book. New York – London: Psychology Press, Taylor & Fransis Group.

Brzeziński, J. (2019). Metodologia badań psychologicznych. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN.

Commons, M., Richards F., Kuhn D. (1982). Systematic and metasystematic reasoning: A case for level of reasoning beyond Piaget’s stage of formal operations. Child Development, 53, 1058–1069.

Gilligan, C., Murphy, J. (1979). Development from adolescence to adulthood: The philosopher and the dilemma of the fact. New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, 9(5), 85–99, doi: 10.1002/cd.23219790507

Kahneman, D. (2012). Pułapki myślenia. O myśleniu szybkim i wolnym. Poznań: Media Rodzina.

Karmiloff-Smith, A., Inhelder, B. (2006). If you want to get ahead, get a theory? W: J.G. Bremmer, C. Lewis (red.), Developmental psychology. Perceptual and cognitive development (t. 3, s. 355–371). London – Thousand Oaks – New Dehli: SAGE Publications.

Kruglanski, A.W., Ajzen, I. (1983). Bias and error in human judgment. European Journal of Social Psychology, 13(1), 1–44, doi: 10.1002/ejsp.2420130102

Kuhn, T.S. (1968). Struktura rewolucji naukowych. Warszawa: Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe.

Labouvie-Vief, G. (1980). Beyond formal operations: Uses and limits of pure logic in life-span development. Human Development, 23(3), 141–161, doi: 10.1159/000272546

Labouvie-Vief, G. (2003). Dynamic integration: Affect, cognition, and the self in adulthood. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 12, 201–206, doi: 10.1046/ j.0963-7214.2003.01262.x

Ledzińska, M. (2002). Stres informacyjny jako zagrożenie dla rozwoju. Roczniki Psychologiczne, 5, 77–97.

Ledzińska, M. (2020). Od informacji do wiedzy w dobie globalizacji. W: H. Liberska, J. Trempała (red.), Psychologia wychowania. Wybrane problemy (s. 121–132). Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN.

Lerner, R.M. (2006). Developmental science, developmental systems, and contemporary theories of human development. W: W. Damon, R.M. Lerner (red.), Handbook of child psychology: Theoretical models of human development (t. 1, s. 1–17). Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons.

Lerner, R.M., Hershberg, R.M., Hilliard, L.J., Johnson, S.K. (2015). Concepts and Theories of Human Development. W: M.H. Bornstein, M.E. Lamb (red.), Developmental Science: An Advanced Textbook (s. 3–42). New York – London: Psychology Press.

Lerner, R.M., Hultsch D.F. (2003). Human Development. A life-span perspective. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company.

Lewicka, M. (1993). Aktor czy obserwator. Psychologiczne mechanizmy odchyleń od racjonalności w myśleniu potocznym. Warszawa – Olsztyn: Polskie Towarzystwo Psychologiczne, Pracownia Wydawnicza.

Lewin, K. (1936/1966). Principles of topological psychology. New York – Toronto – London – Sydney: McGraw-Hill Book Company.

Lewin, K. (1946). Behavior and development as a function of the total situation. W: L. Carmichael (red.), Manual of child psychology (s. 791–844). New York: John Wiley and Sons Inc.

Łukaszewski, W. (2011). Nauka podzielona. Nauka, 4, 7–19.

Malinowski, G. (2020). Logiki wielowartościowe. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN.

Marmion, J.F. (2019). Głupota. Nieoficjalna biografia. Wydawnictwo Dolnośląskie.

Mądrzycki, T. (1986). Deformacje w spostrzeganiu. Warszawa: Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe.

Michalska, P., Szymanik-Kostrzewska, A., Gurba E., Trempała, J. (2016). Rozwój myślenia w dorosłości: o sposobach badania rozumowania postformalnego w codziennych sytuacjach. Psychologia Rozwojowa, 21(2), 55–71, doi: 10.4467/ 20843879PR.16.010.5088

Nosek, B. (2015). Estimating reproducibility of psychological science. Science, 349(6251).

Obuchowski, K. (1997). Zmiany osobowości – założenia i tezy. Forum Psychologiczne, 2(2), 22–30.

Overton, W.F. (2006). Developmental psychology: philosophy, concepts, methodology. W: W. Damon, R.M. Lerner (red.), Handbook of child psychology: Theoretical models of human development (t. 1, s. 18–88). Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons.

Overton, W.F. (2013). Relationism and relational developmental system. A paradigm for developmental science in the post-Cartesian era. W: R.M. Lerner, J.B. Benson (red.), Advances in Child Development and Behavior. Embodiment and Epigenesist: Theoretical and Methodological Issues in Understanding the Role of Biology within the Relational Developmental System. Part A (t. 44, s. 24–64). Oxford: Elsevier.

Pepper, S.C. (1942). World hypotheses: A study in evidence. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.

Perry, W. (1970). Forms of intellectual and ethical development in the college years. New York: Holt, Rinehart, Winston.

Phillips, T. (2020). Prawda. Krótka historia wciskania kitu. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Albatros.

Riegel, K.F. (1975). Toward dialectical theory of development. Human Development, 18, 50–64.

Sala, G., Aksayli, N.D., Tatlidil, K.S., Gondo, Y., Gobet, F. (2019). Working memory training does not enhance older adults’ cognitive skills: A comprehensive meta-analysis. Intelligence, 77, Article 101386, doi: 10.1016/j.intell.2019.101386

Schommer, M. (1990). Effects of beliefs about the nature of knowledge on comprehension. Journal of Educational Psychology, 82(3), 498–504.

Siegel, L.S., Brainerd, Ch.J. (red.), (1978). Alternatives to Piaget. Critical essays on the theory. New York: Academic Press.

Sinnot, J.D. (1984), Postformal reasoning the relativistic stage. W: M.L. Commons, F.A. Richards, C. Armon (red.), Beyond Formal Operations: Late Adolescent and Adult Cognitive Development (s. 298–326). New York: Praeger.

Sinnot, J.D. (1998). The Development of Logic in Adulthood: Postformal Thought and Its Applications. New York: Plenum Press.

Soveri, A., Antfolk, J., Karlsson, L., Salo, B., Laine, M. (2017). Working memory training revisited: A multi-level meta-analysis of n-back training studies. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 24(4), 1077–1096, doi: 10.3758/s13423-016-1217-0

Tatarkiewicz, W. (1978). Historia filozofii. T. 3. Warszawa: Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe.

Teixeira-Santos, A.C., Moreira, C.S., Magalhães, R., Magalhães, C., Pereira, D.R., Leite, J., Carvalho, S., Sampaio, A. (2019). Reviewing working memory training gains in healthy older adults: A meta-analytic review of transfer for cognitive outcomes. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 103, 163–177, doi: 10.1016/ j.neubiorev.2019.05.009

Trempała, J. (1986). Rozwój poznawczy w dorosłości. Kontynuacja rozwoju operacji formalnych czy kształtowanie się nowych jakości poznania. Przegląd Psychologiczny, 29(1), 9–23.

Trempała, J. (1989). Rozumowanie w okresie wczesnej dorosłości. Warszawa – Poznań: Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe.

Trempała, J. (1993). Rozumowanie moralne i odporność dzieci na pokusę oszustwa. Bydgoszcz: Wydawnictwo Uczelniane WSP.

Trempała, J. (2017). Towards the “good” human development theory. Studia Psychologiczne, 55(2), 44–51, doi: 10.2478/V1067-010-0175-4

Trempała, J. (2021). O zachowaniu i rozwoju człowieka. Bydgoszcz: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Kazimierza Wielkiego.

Trempała, J., Pepitone, A., Raven, B.H. (red.), (2006). Lewinian Psychology. Bydgoszcz: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Kazimierza Wielkiego.

Wieczorek, R. (2008). Kontekstualizm i antyrealizm. Próba porównania. Filozofia Nauki, 16(3–4), 63–64.

Wilk, A. (2017). Absolutyzm logiczny a ontologia. Filozofia i Nauka. Studia filozoficzne i interdycyplinarne, 5, 289–297.